The Colors of Mount Fuji

The Colors of Mount Fuji
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 The Colors of Mount Fuji

Mount Fuji  remains the quintessential symbol of Japan.  An active volcano that last erupted in 1708, Fujisan is one of the most photographed mountains in the world.   Mount Fuji  lies 60 miles south-west of Tokyo and on a clear day is visible from the city.  Surrounded by five lakes, the strato volcano has an almost perfect shape and is considered sacred and is one of Japan’s three holy mountains along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku.  In 2013 Mount Fuji was added to the World Heritage List as a Cultural site. 

 

Mount Fuji ‘s beauty has inspired artists over the centuries.  One of the most well known artists is Katsushika Hokusai whose Thirty Six Views of Mount Fuji, are now known through out the world.  Interestingly, despite the name “Thirty Six Views of Mount Fuji”, there are actually 46 wood block prints in the series.  Hokusai created the series between 1826 and 1833  At the time the Berlin blue pigment was becoming more affordable and Hokusai used it generously in his prints in the sky and water segments.  These works are rarely on view to the public because of concerns over the effect that light might have on the paper and pigments.  In 1834, Hokusai created another collection called One Hundred Views of Mount Fuji.   Another great artist inspired in similar fashion by Mount Fuji was Ando Hiroshige.  Hiroshige created two series, one in portrait format and the other in landscape format of Mount Fuji.  The landscape series of Ando Hiroshige’sThirty Six Views of Mount Fuji  was created in 1852 and the portrait oriented series was created in 1858. 

 

Fujisan has inspired artists , photographers and poets over the centuries and continues to do so today. 

mount fuji

mount fuji

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